Bottle dating page

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The website's public educational emphasis helps the SHA to meet one of its goals: "..promote scholarly research and the dissemination of knowledge concerning historical archaeology." The BLM benefits by forging a stronger connection to one of the leading professional organizations within the archaeological world. Government Computer System; before continuing, please read this disclaimer as well as our Privacy Policy.

The move also helps the Department of Interior (DOI) meet recent DOI Inspector General Evaluation Report (#2003-I-0051) recommendations to simplify their web presence, increase security, and control content, while still maintaining a recognizable connection to the Historic Bottle Website. What technology, techniques, or processes were used to manufacture the bottle? Where did the bottle come from, i.e., where was it made and/or used? Where can I go for more information on historic bottles? The opinions expressed on this website are those of the author/content manager of this website and not necessarily those of the Bureau of Land Management or Department of Interior.

Because the bottom is hotter, it is also more fluid and has a tendency to sag, forming a shape like a spinning top which makes it unstable on flat surfaces.

Giving a bottle an arched shape at the bottom means that if it does sag, it can do so without touching the bottom.

One of the most frequently asked questions about old bottles is, 'How old is this bottle?

' Often beginners have a difficult time distinguishing between old and new bottles especially when is comes to modern reproductions.

) to the specific dating questions on the Bottle Dating page are included so that a user can reference the necessary portions of that page.

One can find quite a bit of information on my web site and across the Internet about dating bottles based on whether the mold seam goes up and over the lip or if the bottle has a 'pontil' on the base.

Even given these descriptions beginning often mistake a machine made Owen ring on the base of a bottle with a pontil.

(British Glass 2004) In conjunction with the finish (lip), the various attributes and features found on the base of a bottle allows for some of the better opportunities for the manufacturing based dating of a bottle.

This potential for datable features is very useful since bottles are more often than not lacking embossing - an attribute which can often enhance dating opportunities.

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